UI/UX

User experience design (UXDUED, or XD) is the process of supporting user behavior through usability, usefulness, and desirability provided in the interaction with a product.[2] User experience design encompasses traditional human–computer interaction (HCI) design and extends it by addressing all aspects of a product or service as perceived by users. Experience design (XD) is the practice of designing products, processes, services, events, omnichannel journeys, and environments with a focus placed on the quality of the user experience and culturally relevant solutions. Experience design is not driven by a single design discipline. Instead, it requires a cross-discipline perspective that considers multiple aspects of the brand, business, environment and experience from product, packaging, and retail environment to the clothing and attitude of employees.[citation needed] Experience design seeks to develop the experience of a product, service, or event along any or all of the following dimensions:

  • Duration (initiation, immersion, conclusion, and continuation)
  • Intensity (reflex, habit, engagement)
  • Breadth (products, services, brands, nomenclatures, channels/environment/promotion, and price)
  • Interaction (passive ↔ active ↔ interactive)
  • Triggers (all human senses, concepts, and symbols)
  • Significance (meaning, status, emotion, price, and function)

The user experience (UX or UE) is how a user interacts with and experiences a productsystem or service. It includes a person’s perceptions of utilityease of use, and efficiency. Improving user experience is important to most companies, designers, and creators when creating and refining products because negative user experience can diminish the use of the product and, therefore, any desired positive impacts; conversely, designing toward profitability often conflicts with ethical user experience objectives and even causes harm. User experience is subjective. However, the attributes that make up the user experience are objective.